Category Archives: journal articles

Hlavac, J. et al. Intake Tests for a Short Interpreter-Training Course: Design, Implementation, Feedback

Hlavac, J. et al. (2012) Intake Tests for a Short Interpreter-Training Course: Design, Implementation, Feedback. International Journal of Interpreter Education 4:1.

This article describes an assessment test designed and implemented as a pre-training admission process for a short (30-hour) community interpreter training program in Victoria, Australia.  The training was intended for speakers of “new and emerging languages” (p. 22).  The training program was offered in two cities, to two groups of students.  The trainers were not involved the design or administration of the test.  At the end of the training program, both trainers and trainees were asked to evaluate the intake test by completing a survey. 3 out of 5 trainers and 16 out of 25 trainees completed the evaluation survey. The authors’ focus was on judging the authenticity of the test–that is, whether “the relationship between test contents and the elicitation of skill performance during the test are those skills that were the focus of post-trest training.” 

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Van De Mieroop, D. (2012) The quotative “he/she says” in interpreted doctor-patient interaction

Van De Mieroop, D. (2012) The quotative “he/she says” in interpreted doctor-patient interaction. Interpreting 14:1.

This study looks at data from 4 interpreted medical encounters (Dutch/Russian; Dutch was the providers’ native language, while not all the Russian speakers were native speakers), all interpreted by the same interpreter.  The author discusses the fact that third person (“he says/she says”) interpreting is frequently attested in the literature and in her data, despite scholarly consensus in re the use of the first person in dialogue interpreting, as well as the injunction to use first person in the Flemish government’s Code of Ethics for interpreters.  She points out that use of the third person has been found to serve as a distancing strategy or to mark changes in footing in other settings (such as media interpretation), and seeks to determine what function(s) it serves in medical discourse.  Referencing Goffman’s (1981) notion of participation frameworks, she highlights the interpreter’s dual role as listener (within the provider’s framework) and speaker (within the patient’s framework).

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Jacobsen, B. (2012) The significance of interpreting modes for question-answer dialogues in court interpreting

Jacobsen, B. (2012) The significance of interpreting modes for question-answer dialogues in court interpreting. Interpreting 14:2.

Jacobsen surveyed Danish court interpreters to find out what modes they employ in the courtroom.  The article includes an overview of the court-interpreting-scene in Denmark.  Of note, court interpreters do not have simul equipment, and the courtrooms are very crowded.  Both authorized and unauthorized interpreters work in Danish courts, and the author explains what both of these denominators mean in concrete terms.

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